Asana on Internet Explorer

Asana comes to Internet Explorer

Jennifer Nan and Greg Slovacek

Asana is the place for teamwork. We reduce your team’s frustration with email overload and the friction of trying to keep everyone on the same page while pursuing team goals. By putting conversations and tasks in a single place, Asana helps your team get more done with less effort.

Today, we’re excited to add Internet Explorer 10 to the list of browsers Asana supports. This means if you’re using the latest version of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, or IE, you can communicate and coordinate with anyone on your team.

So why bring Asana to IE now? The answer is twofold – better support for larger organizations and the evolution of Internet Explorer itself.

Better for larger teams
Back in May, we unveiled Organizations, which provides the administrative features and privacy controls for companies to use Asana with 100s to 1000s of team members. In some organizations, specific teams depend on Internet Explorer, so supporting IE means that it’s easier to roll out Asana to everyone in your company.

The progress of Internet Explorer
Asana is a fast and versatile web-based application that pushes the boundaries of what’s possible inside a browser. Our sophisticated Javascript app requires a modern browser platform, and up until now we could only provide the right user experience on Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. With IE10, Internet Explorer has drastically improved their developer tools and made a marked improvement in standards compliance. With these improvements, we were able to confidently develop Asana for IE10, and we’ve been pleasantly surprised by the process. Check out the blog post on our developer site to see what we learned during this project.

IE-DesktopWe’re proud to say that Asana on Internet Explorer offers the same functionality and power as Asana on any other browser. Details are important to us, so here are some areas we gave extra attention to when developing for IE10.

We hope that by offering a fully-featured Asana on Internet Explorer 10, more people can enjoy the benefits of great teamwork. Let us know what you think.

  1. Pingback: Making Asana Work In Internet Explorer - Asana Engineering Blog

  2. avatarAntoine

    Thanks for this launch, because it also means that it is now possible to launch the mobile version of Asana on a Windows Phone 8 ! :-) Yet it still has a lot of bugs. Do you plan on fixing them in the next few weeks ?

    Bye,
    Antoine

    1. avatarSergey

      what exactly C… about IE10 or IE11? You can have pile of C… about any browser including any webkit based browser, just ask… :).
      Broad support of the LATEST browsers it’s very important for any web app that want broad support, especially for enterprise.
      Many customers still restricted to use IE, e.g. banks like HSBC only support IE, and this because … security!!!
      The only thing that I do not like about IE, how they render fonts and I can’t create “users” like in Chrome.

    2. avatarWhitney

      What is obsolete about IE10? Have you even used it? Asserting something without any evidence is quite foolish. While I accept earlier versions of IE have had their quirks, IE10 performs on par, in not better, than the latest Chrome in heavy utilization scenarios, it has a low UX footprint, and has broad support for current web standards. TypeScript, MSFTs latest foray into the JS universe, shows us how far they’re willing to go to support standards over specialization.

      The only think keeping me from using IE10 over Chrome (Sorry Fx, you never had a chance) is the handful of plugins I use for Chrome, along with its syncing functionality. At that point it’s the platform and not the browser I’m so tied to.

    1. avatarAreJ

      Second that. Using Asana on my Surface 2 as we speak, and while it isn’t as zippy as it is on my desktop, it is still much more comfortable to use than the Android version on my other tablet (it’s an old tablet, so that might be why.)

  3. avatarBadPath

    Agreed with Mihai, IE is just crap, it was always crap and it will always be crap, it was a big hole of headaches for any web developers, the best that we can do with IE is to NOT support it, forcing the people to switch to a real browser. We don’t need to debate about what is or not a C*, just use google you will inmediately see how the hell is possible without existing flying people.

    Im sorry but I’m dissapointed about your “good” step on giving food to the evil :)

    1. avatarAsh Menon

      While I am a Chrome user myself, I must defend this point. IE WAS crap, it’s nowhere near as bad right now. Yes, it’s not as good as its competitors even now, but it’s come FAR from the disaster that it used to be. It’s a perfectly usable system right now.

    2. avatarDavid H.

      I do hear comments like that from incompetent developers all the time. The browser of preference is end users’ choice not developers.

      1. avatarCarlos

        Not at all sif the end user “decides use ie6″ you will support it ?, Jquery team tells NO and i agree if your reply its about family of browsers and not browser or version i agree we must support all 4 mayor browsers dont forget OPERA, IE, FIREFOX, CHROME, BUT they must suport standards if an standard its settled for lets say use “green” to paint a button red and make it a circle (a dumb example, but works) we developers must use it standard first and so on if we have enough time/budget we can use their tweaks for that standard, that way we push browsers to be a usable plataform to build a better web and not create the next ie5-6 monster that only listen to his own dumb instruction set, decided for their, StUp1d T3@m

  4. avatarFernando

    I wonder how Microsoft feel when companies have to dedicate more resources just to make things work on their platform. Congrats for making the effort. I am sure that it made business sense but I wish companies penalize Microsoft for not keeping up with the standards and sometimes blocking their development.

    1. avatar–MM–

      Asana did not use standards. It used old ECMAScript extensions created by Mozilla (adopted also in Webkit). That was the main reason it didn’t work anywhere besides Gecko and Webkit based browsers, not that dumb evasion from Asana developers “IE fires onresize twice and we don’t know how to deal with it”. No additional resources should be needed for IE9+. It wouldn’t be hard to make Asana work even in IE6, but developers are “too progressive” to think about true browser independence and user freedom.

  5. avatarMike

    Nice move if really late actually. IE9 was already if not great but a decent browser. IE10 support coming now that IE11 is out was LONG overdue. I also very much agree with -MM-. People commenting “IE is crap” should ask themselves if they do use lots of proprietary stuff like webkit or iOS specific development and do exactly what they do complain about: Standard usage.

  6. avatarRhys

    Please can we have a genuinely working iOS app, one that works on an iPad properly, and that offers offline use. So many people work on the move these days, and being tied to a browser for anything but the most basic tasks makes for a difficult experience of Asana.

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  8. avatarDavid C

    Why stop at IE6, why not support, C64, Amiga 500, and Amstrad while you’re at it? Building modern Apps for old technology takes engineering efforts away from core innovation. There are only limited resources and they are best spent building software where the majority of users are.

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