Building Asana’s foundation

Kasey Fleisher Hickey and Prashant Pandey

When software just works, it’s largely thanks to solid infrastructure. For Asana, a top priority is ensuring that our service is built on a foundation that is reliable.

Our infrastructure team operates behind-the-scenes to ensure that your team runs on Asana, every day. The infrastructure team’s efforts enable Asana to be secure, allow us to add new functionality without breaking things in the process, and pave the road for millions of intricate connections between people, tasks, teams, and projects. We’re focused on making a product that you can trust and we want to make sure the most talented people are working on its framework.

We recently welcomed the newest member of our team, Prashant Pandey, to help us take our infrastructure efforts to the next level and in turn, support growth across our product, team, and user base.
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Do great things: A talk at TechCrunch Disrupt

Justin Rosenstein

On May 5, I will be speaking at TechCrunch Disrupt NY on using technology to help humanity thrive. I hope some of you will be able to attend, either in person or via livestream. After the conference, we’ll share the full video in this post.

As technologists, we have greater capacity to change the world today than the kings and presidents of just 100 years ago.

Incredibly, we can now design the world we want to live in, and have the engineering skill to make even global-scale designs a reality. As designers, engineers, and technology leaders, we are a tiny portion of humanity, yet we hold an astoundingly leveraged ability to affect all of it.

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5 reasons why I haven’t used email in 25 days

Emily Kramer

On April 1, Jim and I gave up email. 25 days later, I haven’t checked, sent, or read a work or personal email, and Jim has had only 2 mishaps. During April, the most frequent questions I’ve received about giving up email are, “How are you doing this?” and “Why are you doing this?”. The first answer is obvious: Asana. The second answer is a bit longer:

1. Email is a time suck.

We spend about 30% of our time at work in email (according to McKinsey). That seems like a lot of time spent NOT getting work done. I wondered how much time I’d get back not worrying about work or personal email.

2. I was halfway there.

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Round Two - 30 Days Without Email

30 days without email challenge: Round 2 update

Emily Kramer and Jim Renaud

On April 1, we gave up work and personal email for the month for our “30 Days Without Email Challenge”. After 11 days without email, Emily has taken (a decisive?) lead.

Jim has had 2 email violations–he caved when he had to check an email design in his work email early in the morning when no one was in the office and had to check his personal email for a rebate on a recent purchase. Emily has still been email free, but suffered a few close calls while changing passwords due to the Heartbleed bug. Getting automated information (password resets, account information, flight information, etc) via email has proven to be the most difficult part of the challenge for Emily. Communication with friends and teammates hasn’t been much of a challenge, and has been replaced with more texting, Facebook messaging, and (of course) Asana.

Emily is confident she will keep her lead over Jim, while Jim is hoping for a comeback! Stay tuned for more updates.

Please note: Jim was not harmed in the making of this photo. The black eye was added in the editing process.

wufoo_animated

Wufoo & Asana: Connect forms to your tasks

Justin Krause and Kelsey Aroian

The process of collecting structured information–from users needing support, partners requesting to work with you, candidates applying to a job, and even from teams within your company–is often tedious and difficult to manage. We wanted a simpler way to get this information into Asana, with the rest of our work and communication. So, we decided to build an integration using our API, with our favorite tool for building beautiful custom forms, Wufoo.

With Wufoo and Asana, data you collect through web forms becomes actionable. With little work on your end and without any coding required, you can gather custom information that feeds directly into Asana tasks. Then you can add assignees, followers, due dates, and attachments, and connect data with other relevant Asana tasks and projects.
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COllageV5.001

Futurasana: brainstorming 2016

Reigan Combs and Jackie Bavaro

Imagine this: the year is 2016. It’s the beginning of the day and you’ve just arrived at work. You sit down at your desk (assuming that having a desk is still a “thing”) and open Asana. What do you see?

We spent the past week thinking about this question as part of our first-ever, company-wide brainstorm, “Futurasana”. Considering that our company is only 3 years old, fast-forwarding two years was a big leap.
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10, 9, 8, 7….Snaptask!

Greg Slovacek and Cliff Chang

At Asana, we’re re-imagining team communication from the ground up. While some tasks take months to complete, some only take a day, and others need to get done instantly. Until today, there was no direct and simple way to indicate task urgency in Asana. So, during our recent Hackathon, we added a new feature to Asana: Snaptask.

“We believe the future of workplace communication is fast–really fast” -Dustin Moskovitz

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30 days without email challenge

Emily Kramer, Jim Renaud, and Joey Dello Russo

Tomorrow, we (Emily Kramer and Jim Renaud) will give up work and personal email for the entire month of April. Our “30 Days Without Email Challenge” was inspired by Asana’s goal of enabling “teamwork without email”, and we are both excited to see how the challenge affects our productivity.

The rules:

  • We cannot open email for any reason during the month
  • If we do open email, we lose a point for every email we send or read
  • Any filters or forwarding must be set up in advance

We will keep you updated with our progress throughout the month–stay tuned!

Week 1 Update:
After 4 days without email, both of us are both going strong. While friends, family, and commenters on social media and this post have expressed anxiety on our behalf, we’ve found life without email to be pretty simple so far. We’ve both come up with some workarounds, but neither one of us have sent or read an email.

Week 2 Update:
After 11 days without email, Emily has taken the lead. Jim has had 2 email violations. Check out our post.

The NEW Asana Guide

Emily Kramer, Jim Renaud, and Justin Krause

We’ve launched an all-new version of the Asana Guide, where we post content to help teams get the most out of Asana. If you’re already familiar with the Guide, you’ll love the new version even more – lots of new articles and videos are waiting for you. If you haven’t seen the Guide before, you need to check it out now – it’s the best support we can provide to your team.

guide-cafe

Here are a few reasons why we think you and your team will love it (we could have come up with 50 reasons, but we think you’ll get more benefit out of visiting the Guide than reading 50 reasons why you should visit it):

1. All new content and design

New articles, new videos, new images, and a new design. We’ve made it easier to discover new Asana content, while keeping a relaxing reading experience.
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pastel shirts and projects

Asana features we can’t live without (part deux)

Kelsey Aroian

Last week, we shared seven features that make our work day just a little bit sweeter here at Asana HQ. From secret projects to a trick that might raise your IQ, we’re back again to share another round of Asana features we can’t live without! Make sure to tell us about your favorite features in the comments.

Colored tags – Justin K, Marketing
I love colored tags because I look good in pastels…and so do my projects.

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