Category Archives: Culture

Marcos Medina

Narwhals v. Unicorns: the story of the Asana soccer mascot

Kasey Fleisher Hickey and Marcos Medina

When Marcos Medina was living in his hometown of Barcelona, he stumbled upon the Designer Fund Bridge program through a link on Twitter. Little did he know that just a few months later, his life would look pretty different: he’d be living on the other side of the world, standing in front of a team of people, talking about the pros and cons of using a Narwhal as a mascot representing his company’s athletic brand.

Marcos applied to the Bridge program, which connects designers with some of the most exciting startups in the San Francisco Bay Area, and was introduced to Asana. Since then he’s been a key member of Asana’s design team. Beyond the incredible career opportunities, Bridge offers members mentorship and a community of professional peers. For Marcos, Bridge provided the support he needed to leave his home and life in Spain and feel confident that the company he’d end up working for would be the perfect fit for him, and vice versa.

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Episode 10 Summary: Feb 2014 – May 2014

Dustin Moskovitz and Justin Rosenstein

At the end of every “Episode” of work at Asana, each team writes a summary of the work they’ve accomplished to share with the company. We’ve synthesized the highlights from the episode into this post to help you follow along with our progress.

Asana TeamAsana is steadily becoming an essential piece of infrastructure for the best teams around the world, across the most innovative industries including tech, healthcare, and education. In Episode 10, customer growth accelerated, and today, thousands of companies across every continent but one are running their business on Asana.

We want Asana to be a product that you rely on every day. In Episode 10, we moved closer to that goal: we made major investments in our application infrastructure, ran more growth and user experiments than ever, expanded our team in critical areas, including mobile, and began working on some major new features you’ll be hearing about soon.

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Asana's User Operations Team

How we work: Asana + Desk.com to keep you running

Josh Torres

If you’ve ever written to Asana with a question, or asked for help using a new feature, it’s likely one of our friendly UO (User Operations) team members personally responded to you. Our User Operations team (often referred to at other companies as ‘customer operations’ or ‘support’) prides itself on a thoughtful, timely, and user-first approach to work. We keep up with thousands of tickets, while maintaining a consistent feedback loop between customers and engineers, to enhance the product you use every day.

We recently shared some insights with Desk.com about ways a small team can provide support to a large customer base. Here’s a closer look at how we support you, using Asana.

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5 reasons why I haven’t used email in 25 days

Emily Kramer

On April 1, Jim and I gave up email. 25 days later, I haven’t checked, sent, or read a work or personal email, and Jim has had only 2 mishaps. During April, the most frequent questions I’ve received about giving up email are, “How are you doing this?” and “Why are you doing this?”. The first answer is obvious: Asana. The second answer is a bit longer:

1. Email is a time suck.

We spend about 30% of our time at work in email (according to McKinsey). That seems like a lot of time spent NOT getting work done. I wondered how much time I’d get back not worrying about work or personal email.

2. I was halfway there.

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Round Two - 30 Days Without Email

30 days without email challenge: Round 2 update

Emily Kramer and Jim Renaud

On April 1, we gave up work and personal email for the month for our “30 Days Without Email Challenge”. After 11 days without email, Emily has taken (a decisive?) lead.

Jim has had 2 email violations–he caved when he had to check an email design in his work email early in the morning when no one was in the office and had to check his personal email for a rebate on a recent purchase. Emily has still been email free, but suffered a few close calls while changing passwords due to the Heartbleed bug. Getting automated information (password resets, account information, flight information, etc) via email has proven to be the most difficult part of the challenge for Emily. Communication with friends and teammates hasn’t been much of a challenge, and has been replaced with more texting, Facebook messaging, and (of course) Asana.

Emily is confident she will keep her lead over Jim, while Jim is hoping for a comeback! Stay tuned for more updates.

Please note: Jim was not harmed in the making of this photo. The black eye was added in the editing process.

COllageV5.001

Futurasana: brainstorming 2016

Reigan Combs and Jackie Bavaro

Imagine this: the year is 2016. It’s the beginning of the day and you’ve just arrived at work. You sit down at your desk (assuming that having a desk is still a “thing”) and open Asana. What do you see?

We spent the past week thinking about this question as part of our first-ever, company-wide brainstorm, “Futurasana”. Considering that our company is only 3 years old, fast-forwarding two years was a big leap.
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30 days without email challenge

Emily Kramer, Jim Renaud, and Joey Dello Russo

Tomorrow, we (Emily Kramer and Jim Renaud) will give up work and personal email for the entire month of April. Our “30 Days Without Email Challenge” was inspired by Asana’s goal of enabling “teamwork without email”, and we are both excited to see how the challenge affects our productivity.

The rules:

  • We cannot open email for any reason during the month
  • If we do open email, we lose a point for every email we send or read
  • Any filters or forwarding must be set up in advance

We will keep you updated with our progress throughout the month–stay tuned!

Week 1 Update:
After 4 days without email, both of us are both going strong. While friends, family, and commenters on social media and this post have expressed anxiety on our behalf, we’ve found life without email to be pretty simple so far. We’ve both come up with some workarounds, but neither one of us have sent or read an email.

Week 2 Update:
After 11 days without email, Emily has taken the lead. Jim has had 2 email violations. Check out our post.

Tyson

My experience as a Designer-in-Residence at Asana

Tyson Kallberg

Over the past year, we’ve partnered with the Designer Fund for Bridge, a program that connects experienced designers with top startups in San Francisco. For the most recent Bridge session, Asana welcomed Tyson Kallberg to our team as our second Designer-In-Residence.   

It was a crisp August night on a turf field in the Bayshore, and I’d just skinned my knee trying to keep a ball inbounds. I landed in San Francisco a few hours before and found myself playing offense on the Asana soccer team the night before my full day of on-site interviews at the office.

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The best advice I have for leaders and teams

Justin Rosenstein

Recently I spoke at Chicago Ideas Week, where I distilled some of the best advice I have after ten years of studying and leading teams. We’re excited to share the video.

The first half of the talk is about the purpose of work, and how I’ve found a deep sense of personal satisfaction from doing work in service of helping humanity thrive. The second half (starting at 7:10) provides three concrete strategies, which I’ve found make teams wildly more effective in accomplishing their goals – all by achieving clarity. I hope you enjoy it.

Culture at Asana: A group of peers on a bold mission

Emily Kramer and Sara Himeles

Doing great things requires more than a great product, it requires a great culture and team as well. At Asana, we’ve assembled a group of peers who are motivated by our core values and mission: to help humanity thrive by enabling all teams to work together effortlessly.

We’ve compiled many of our best practices and values in the below presentation. From Episodes and Polish Week, to our office perks and hiring principles, it’s all in there! Yesterday, this presentation was featured in SlideShare’s Culture Code Campaign; visit the SlideShare blog to see how other companies approach office culture.



If you’re interested in joining our team, check out our job openings.