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You can count on us: Task row numbers in the new Asana

We count on your feedback to make Asana better. So when we launched the new Asana in September, we started collecting comments right away. And we learned that many of you really rely on task row numbers, a feature that we removed in the new Asana. So we’re happy to say that you can now enable task row numbers in your display settings.

task details illustrationIf you never noticed the numbers in the old version of Asana, you may want to check it out. Task row numbers are a great way to reference a task inside of a project, especially in a meeting, e.g., “Check out task numbers 5–7 to see the results of our last tests.” Bottom line: If you like ordered lists, this feature is for you.

So why did we remove numbers in the first place?

Our goal for the new Asana was to provide a simpler, clearer experience. Removing task row numbers was an effective way to de-clutter the interface and improve clarity, especially for new users. But for people who are used to the numbers, it really disrupted their workflow.  

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So task row numbers are back as a setting. This way, people who use and love task row numbers can have them, and for those who don’t need them they aren’t there to distract you from the features you do use.

Enable task row numbers, and other display settings

To enable task row numbers, go to My Profile Settings and click “Display”. You’ll see a checkbox for task row numbers, as well as the ability to change your background or enable compact mode.

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compact mode gif

Compact mode makes each task row a little shorter, so you can see more tasks on the screen at one time. This doesn’t make the font any smaller, it just reduces some of the white space around each task name.

If you have projects with tons of tasks in them, task row numbers and compact mode might be for you. Go to your display settings to try them out, and be sure to let us know what you think.  

Special thanks to

Dean Rzonca, Vanessa Koch, Katie Schmalzried

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