Round Two - 30 Days Without Email

30 days without email challenge: Round 2 update

Emily Kramer and Jim Renaud

On April 1, we gave up work and personal email for the month for our “30 Days Without Email Challenge”. After 11 days without email, Emily has taken (a decisive?) lead.

Jim has had 2 email violations–he caved when he had to check an email design in his work email early in the morning when no one was in the office and had to check his personal email for a rebate on a recent purchase. Emily has still been email free, but suffered a few close calls while changing passwords due to the Heartbleed bug. Getting automated information (password resets, account information, flight information, etc) via email has proven to be the most difficult part of the challenge for Emily. Communication with friends and teammates hasn’t been much of a challenge, and has been replaced with more texting, Facebook messaging, and (of course) Asana.

Emily is confident she will keep her lead over Jim, while Jim is hoping for a comeback! Stay tuned for more updates.

Please note: Jim was not harmed in the making of this photo. The black eye was added in the editing process.

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Wufoo & Asana: Connect forms to your tasks

Justin Krause and Kelsey Aroian

The process of collecting structured information–from users needing support, partners requesting to work with you, candidates applying to a job, and even from teams within your company–is often tedious and difficult to manage. We wanted a simpler way to get this information into Asana, with the rest of our work and communication. So, we decided to build an integration using our API, with our favorite tool for building beautiful custom forms, Wufoo.

With Wufoo and Asana, data you collect through web forms becomes actionable. With little work on your end and without any coding required, you can gather custom information that feeds directly into Asana tasks. Then you can add assignees, followers, due dates, and attachments, and connect data with other relevant Asana tasks and projects.
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Futurasana: brainstorming 2016

Reigan Combs and Jackie Bavaro

Imagine this: the year is 2016. It’s the beginning of the day and you’ve just arrived at work. You sit down at your desk (assuming that having a desk is still a “thing”) and open Asana. What do you see?

We spent the past week thinking about this question as part of our first-ever, company-wide brainstorm, “Futurasana”. Considering that our company is only 3 years old, fast-forwarding two years was a big leap.
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10, 9, 8, 7….Snaptask!

Greg Slovacek and Cliff Chang

At Asana, we’re re-imagining team communication from the ground up. While some tasks take months to complete, some only take a day, and others need to get done instantly. Until today, there was no direct and simple way to indicate task urgency in Asana. So, during our recent Hackathon, we added a new feature to Asana: Snaptask.

“We believe the future of workplace communication is fast–really fast” -Dustin Moskovitz

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30 days without email challenge

Emily Kramer, Jim Renaud, and Joey Dello Russo

Tomorrow, we (Emily Kramer and Jim Renaud) will give up work and personal email for the entire month of April. Our “30 Days Without Email Challenge” was inspired by Asana’s goal of enabling “teamwork without email”, and we are both excited to see how the challenge affects our productivity.

The rules:

  • We cannot open email for any reason during the month
  • If we do open email, we lose a point for every email we send or read
  • Any filters or forwarding must be set up in advance

We will keep you updated with our progress throughout the month–stay tuned!

Week 1 Update:
After 4 days without email, both of us are both going strong. While friends, family, and commenters on social media and this post have expressed anxiety on our behalf, we’ve found life without email to be pretty simple so far. We’ve both come up with some workarounds, but neither one of us have sent or read an email.

Week 2 Update:
After 11 days without email, Emily has taken the lead. Jim has had 2 email violations. Check out our post.

The NEW Asana Guide

Emily Kramer, Jim Renaud, and Justin Krause

We’ve launched an all-new version of the Asana Guide, where we post content to help teams get the most out of Asana. If you’re already familiar with the Guide, you’ll love the new version even more – lots of new articles and videos are waiting for you. If you haven’t seen the Guide before, you need to check it out now – it’s the best support we can provide to your team.

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Here are a few reasons why we think you and your team will love it (we could have come up with 50 reasons, but we think you’ll get more benefit out of visiting the Guide than reading 50 reasons why you should visit it):

1. All new content and design

New articles, new videos, new images, and a new design. We’ve made it easier to discover new Asana content, while keeping a relaxing reading experience.
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pastel shirts and projects

Asana features we can’t live without (part deux)

Kelsey Aroian

Last week, we shared seven features that make our work day just a little bit sweeter here at Asana HQ. From secret projects to a trick that might raise your IQ, we’re back again to share another round of Asana features we can’t live without! Make sure to tell us about your favorite features in the comments.

Colored tags – Justin K, Marketing
I love colored tags because I look good in pastels…and so do my projects.

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End of Episode 9 summary: Oct 2013-Jan 2014

Dustin Moskovitz and Justin Rosenstein

At the end of every “Episode” of work at Asana, each team writes a summary of the work they’ve accomplished to share with the company. We’ve synthesized the highlights from those documents into this post to help you follow along with our progress.

Episode 9 was one of the best periods of growth and momentum in the company’s short history. The product improved in big and small ways, and the business is not only thriving, but accelerating. Within the episode, we built upon existing strengths — like feature development, supporting our customers, engineering process, and telling our story to the press. Some areas that used to be weaknesses — like concisely communicating our value — became strengths. And plans to address other areas for improvement — like mobile — are well underway.

Our progress internally has led to more love from our users, increased user growth, and more premium customers. Not only do we continue to be the go-to solution for the technology industry, with enthusiastic customers like Uber, Dropbox, and Pinterest, but we are increasingly trusted within more traditional industries. This growth enabled us to exceed our E9 growth and revenue goals, an important measure of our success in enabling more teams to work together with less effort.
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Asana features we can’t live without

Kelsey Aroian

We think it’s the details, like adding a task to multiple projects or having kittens rain on your workspace, that make communicating in Asana so magical. Discovering hidden functionality can inspire a personal productivity hack or add a new level of delight in day-to-day communication. Since we geek out over product details as much as you do, we thought we’d share some essential Asana features that our team just can’t live without.

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New project Views have arrived in Asana

Stephanie Hornung and Phips Peter

Today, we are changing the way completed tasks work and adding more project Views to Asana, as we mentioned in December. Completed tasks contain conversations, attachments, and notes that are essential to your team’s work and communication. Seeing completed tasks in-line with your upcoming work is often helpful, but sometimes you just want to see what’s left to do. Our new View options make it easy to see the tasks you want to see, when you want to see them.

Previously, completed tasks piled up at the top of your My Tasks list and Projects, completed tasks did not remain in Sections, and sorting across active, completed, and archived tasks was difficult. Now, you can customize your Views and organize your tasks (even if they have been completed) in more ways. For additional details on what’s changed and how this may affect your workflow, read our previous blog post.

Completed tasks main

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